Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

In a complimentary webinar on February 20 (1:00 p.m. ET), our colleagues Frank C. Morris, Jr., and Adam C. Solander will review the ongoing impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on employers and their group health plans.

The Treasury Department and the Internal Revenue Service recently issued highly anticipated final regulations implementing the employer

A recent article in Bloomberg BNA’s Health Insurance Report will be of interest to financial services employers: “ACA’s Employer ‘Pay or Play’ Mandate Delayed – What Now for Employers?” by Frank C. Morris, Jr., and Adam C. Solander, colleagues of ours, based in Epstein Becker Green’s Washington, DC, office.

Following is an

Our Epstein Becker Green colleague Stuart M. Gerson recently commented in an article titled “4th Circuit Upholds ACA’s Employer Mandate, Says Insurance Regulation Within Commerce,” by Mary Anne Pazanowski, in Bloomberg BNA’s Health Care Daily Report.

Following is an excerpt:

A unanimous U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit July 11 declared the

Our colleagues Kara Maciel, Frank C. Morris Jr., Elizabeth Bradley, and Adam Solander have posted a client advisory on the recent ACA employer mandate delay, exploring the ramifications and unresolved issues that employers should consider. Following is an excerpt:

In reaction to employers’ concerns about the many difficulties posed in efforts to comply with

By Gretchen Harders and Michelle Capezza

On May 8, 2013, the Employee Benefits Security Administration of the Department of Labor (the “DOL”) issued Technical Release 2013-02 (the “Release”) providing important guidance under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (the “Affordable Care Act”)

Allen B. Roberts, a Member of Firm in the Labor and Employment practice and co-chair of the firm’s Whistleblowing and Compliance Subpractice Group, in the New York office, wrote an article titled “Impact: Employers Brace for Change – Top 5 Issues Facing Businesses, as appeared in Insurance Advocate.”

Following is an excerpt:

By: Allen B. Roberts, Victoria M. Sloan

The typical set of protections or awards featured in a familiar array of whistleblower statutes has a new entrant with the imposition of mandated reporting in the Elder Justice Act section of the recently enacted Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“PPACA”). In a notable departure from other laws, the Elder Justice Act provides that every individual employed by or associated with a long-term care facility as an owner, operator, agent or contractor has an independent obligation to report a “reasonable suspicion” of a crime affecting residents or recipients of care. Reports must be made directly to both the Secretary of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) and one or more law enforcement entities in as little as two hours following the formation of the reasonable suspicion.

Although limited to reports of crimes against residents and recipients of services of long-term care facilities, the mandate of the Elder Justice Act sets a new standard of conduct – and backs it up with stiff penalties affecting long-term care facilities and those associated with them.


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